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money, and then on everybody else. not so he can lower the debt or the deficit, but so he can spend to his heart's content. for months, the president has been saying that all he wanted to raise taxes on the top 2% so he can tackle the debt and the deficit. however, yesterday, he finally revealed that that is not really is true intent. by demanding the power to raise the debt limit whenever he wants, by as much as he wants, he showed what he is really after is assuming unprecedented power to spend taxpayer dollars without any limit at all. this is not about getting a handle on deficits or debt or him. it is about spending even more than he already has. why else would you demand the power to raise the debt limit on his own? by the way, why on earth would we consider giving a president who has brought us four years of trillion dollar unchecked deficits of 30 to borrow? he is the last person who should have borrowing power. the only way we will cut spending around here is by using the debate over the debt limit to do it. now the president wants to remove that to cut all together. of cou
the president called his deficit reduction commission to give the president and -- an idea what we could do to get our fiscal house in order. i want to show in you this chart, mr. speaker, it's the chronic deficits we have had in this country, goes back to 1970. all this red ink represents the inflation adjusted, 2012 dollars, comparing apples to apples across this chart, the deficit that is we have had in this country, and you see going back to 197 o 0, mr. speaker, which happens to be the year of my birth, we have run a deficit every single year from 199 . you remember 1998 we had newt gingrich leading the first republican u.s. house of representatives in modern times. bill clinton in the white house. they came together to solve some big problems. welfare reform, health insurance reform. folks forget about health insurance reform. we did away with pre-existing conditions. did away with all of the impediments in the large group markets, what they call the plans, had great success in that area, and finally got back into some positive territory. to be truthful, this assumes that all the fede
deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. if the president doesn't agree with our proposal, i believe he's got an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own, a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. we're ready and eager to talk to the president about such a plan. >> you did speak with the president earlier this week. can you characterize that call? did he have any kind of count offer and we understand that he is making clear that it's got to be increase rates for the wealthy or no deal. are you willing to give a little bit? >> the phone call was pleasant but was more of the same. the conversations that the staff had yesterday were more of the same. it's time for the president if he's serious to come back to was a count offer. >> the jobs record indicated unemployment is down roughly a full point from this time last year. if no deal happens -- [inaudible] . why take such a risk when the job numbers are improving. >> because increasing tax rates will hit many small businesses that produc
, and he said that it is untanble to not cut them because they are driving the budget deficit, and, you know, the whole entitlement issues, the real core of the problem, the taxing issue, yes, the pyrotechnics, and its -- there's the struggle between the republican and democratic view, but all the numbers people know that it's the entitlement issue so if there's a fix, trajectory to make it somehow stable, that would be -- that's the relation. uh-oh, you have something from the book. >> your books are all ultimately about power, how it's used, squandered, built, and so the sub text of the events that you write about is how life works, how washington works. my favorite sentence in "the price of politics" is, "when you need friends, it's too late to make them." what have you learned about washington and life from the grand bargain? what is the hundred-year lesson from how that unraveled? >> well, you mean last year? what happened last year? well, that they found a way to postpone everything, and, again, they can postpone lots of the problems, but postponement is the theme. the cliche, "ki
to hearing today from the experts that we have before us today on how to reduce the deficit while protecting middle income families. as we enter the holiday season, americans should not have to face the uncertainty that many will face with regard to their taxes. there is no reason that middle income families should go into this holiday season without knowing whether their taxes will go up next year. last year, democrats and republicans work together to cut nearly $1 trillion of spending. now we need to continue that bi-partisan work to cut more spending, and to bring in additional revenues. if congress fails to reach an agreement under the budget control act of 2011, $1.2 trillion in automatic spending cuts will take place between 2013 and 2021. republicans and democrats agree that indiscriminate across-the- board cuts is not the right and to do at this time in our nation's history. if we trigger the automatic spending cuts and tax increases, gross margin bottom will fall by half a percentage point. we will reverse the hard-fought gains over the past few years. we cannot afford to go backwar
chief of staff, erskine bowles, who chaired the first deficit reduction commission. they're concerned about the dangers ahead. so concerned that simpson took to the dance floor to urge young people to get involved. we'll also get the take of rising democratic star cory booker, the mayor of newark. what's his answer to the washington gridlock? and is he planning a run for governor against chris christie. for analysis, we'll turn to joe klein of "time" magazine. "washington post" columnist michael gerson and our own norah o'donnell and major garrett, our chief white house correspondent. it's all ahead on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: good morning again. well to the famous combos of modern life, from mac and cheese peanut butter and jelly rum and coke, bread and butter, and salt and pep pepper, add one more pair simpson-bowles. alan simpson may be in wyomingy and erskine bowles in north carolina but you can't mention one without think of the other. when you headed up the bipartisan deficit c
. we have been talking about a snow deficit over the last several weeks. look at some of these departures ahead of the storm system. still very mild. in the 70s in little rock and the 50sin columbus ohio. behind it, much colder. >> maria, thanks. >>> coming up, our first look at the british nurse that is caught in a prank on the royal family. and prince william and kate devastated after that nurse is believed to have taken her own life. and now the not so funny prank backfiring on the pranksters. >> and the star of a wildly popular song hitting a sour note, now apologizing for comments he made about the united states just days before he is set to meet with president obama. and a new factor complicating efforts to reach a deal over the fiscal cliff. the president needs to make the next move. >> it is not going to help our economy, and it is not going to help those seeking work. i came out to put revenues on the table and to take a step toward the president to resolve this. when is he going take a step toward us? >>> welcome back and time for a quick check of the head lo
're running a trillion dollar deficit year single year. if we went back to zero, we're rebalanced. right now with the fourth year in a row, that deficit and debt continues to climb. so it doesn't really wipe it out and the challenge of it is what does that do to the overall economy. we're not just dealing with one tax increase as well. a lot of people lose track of that. the affordable care about actually begin on january 1st as well for people making $200,000 or more. or people having large medical bills. this is talking about an additional tax increase on top of that. >> what about what bill clinton said? he said once things start to get better and that's a crucial point he was making. once the economy starts to get better, taxes have to go up on the middle class. do you agree? is. >> i don't, actually. and the reason being is that right now, if you look at the real math, in 2007 and 012, we have the same amount of revenue. now, 2008 and 2009, we had a dramatic drop in federal revenues, but we've slowly climbed back up. revenue has gone up every year of the obama administration and now, we
it's not 17% of our debt because right now we have a trillion dollar deficit every single year. if we went back to zero, that's true. right now with fourth year in a row with over a trillion dollars in deficit spending, that deficit and debt continues it to climb. it doesn't wipe it out. what does it do to the overall economy. we're not just dealing with one tax increase right now. the affordable care act actually begin on january 1st as well for people making $200,000 or more or people with large medical bills. that already starts coming up. this is an additional tax increase on top of that tax increase. >> what about what bill clinton said? he said once things start to get better, and that's a crucial point he was making. he wasn't saying doing it right away. once it gets better, taxes go up on the middle class. do you agree with that? >> i don't, actually. the reason being is that right now if you look at the real math on it, in 2007 and 2012 we have the same amount of revenue. obviously 2008 and '09 we had a dramatic drop in federal revenues coming in. we've slowly climbed back up
in washington negotiate a bad deal on the bucket and deficit, what do you think will happen to medicare and medicaid benefits. >> it stars two senator and two republican reps. cnn reports the labor unions are spending more than a half of million dollars on this round of spots. we're back with more steph after the break. stay with us. ♪ going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out for us. [♪ theme music ♪] >> stephanie: okay. and as we mentioned, unemployment numbers. hello! [ ♪ patriotic music ♪ ] >> stephanie: the lowest in four years. >> wow! >> stephanie: it has dropped to 7.7%. >> you're welcome america, i did that. >> no, you didn't. >> stephanie: right. [ applause
to the white house press secretary says, look, the whole thing here is not about deficit reduction, listen. >> deficit reduction in and of itself is not the goal here. the reason to get our fiscal house in order. the reason to pass a deficit reduction package that is balanced and allows for economic growth and job creation is to put our economy on a sustainable fiscal path, which, then itself produces positive economic benefits and growth and jobs. >> okay. so here's the problem with that jay carney speaking for the president. speaking for the president, president obama, think back a couple years ago, in fact, it was october of 2008 when he was senator obama wanting to be president obama. he was concerned about the deficit and the debt. listen to what he had to say back then. >> the problem is the way bush has done it over the last 8 years is to take out a credit card from the bank of china in the name of our children, driving up our national debt from $5 trillion from the first 42 presidents, number 43 ed a $4 trillion by his lonesome so we now have over $9 trillion of debt that we're goi
overwhelming the deficit story was at that point. you know, you look at that administration. the coming in, just no one thought they could do anything. it's not unlike the conversations we're having now. and they went in, they did the deal, president bush had to shift from read my lips to as only he could put it, read my hips. and it was good for the country, it created a political dynamic that cost president bush the election in 1992, and which we're still living, because that gave us grover norquist, et cetera. >> let's get to grover norquist in a minute, but i do have a question. the gop plan consists of $2.2 trillion in savings over a decade. that includes raging the eligibility age for medicare from 65 to 67. and lowering cost of living increases for social security benefits. they also propose overhauling the tax code to generate $800 billion in new revenue. but without raising taxes on the wealthy. in a letter to the president, leading republicans compared their plan to one erskine bowles drew up last year. >> not even close. >> he rejected that connection and the white house, of cou
in the campaign, which is a balanced, responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses certainty and make sure the country grows. >> tom: the president rejected the proposal republicans presented him yesterday. it would cut the debt by $2.2 trillion over ten years, but would not raise taxes on america's highest earners, the biggest sticking point. the two sides seem to be allowing themselves room to bargain. the president said today he'd be open to lowering tax rates for high earners later next year as part of a broad tax reform package. and senate republican leader mitch mcconnell did not directly endorse the g.o.p. plan. for now, house speaker boehner put the ball in the president's court, releasing a statement: "the president now has an obligation to respond with a proposal that can pass both chambers of congress." >> susie: we turn tonight to other opinions on the fiscal cliff impasse. we talk with the chairman of the national governor's association, and we also hear from a leading advocate for responsible fiscal policy. we begin with governor jack markell, the demo
to see trillion deficits for as far as the eye can see. listen, washington's got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. >> joining me now are richard wolffe, the executive editor of msnbc.com and an msnbc political analyst, and robert reich, former labor secretary and a professor at the university of california berkeley. he is also the author of "beyond outrage." richard, i want to go to you first here. the president talked quite a bit in the election cycle. >> quite a bit. >> he did, period, about the fever breaking amongst republicans in congress . >> yes. >> it's been quite feverish of late, which is to say a lot of back and forth, a lot of hot air blown from the house caucus. i wonder if you think that fever might be breaking with the suggestion john boehner said, even if the president gets his way on tax rates, which would seem to open the door to that possibility. >> it's a bit to latch on to that. they cannot settle on a position. very different from the last time around. and it's true. the white house has said both publicly and privately, look, we're prepared to see all
for raising revenues, cutting spending and reduce the deficit by $4 trillion over the next ten years. he said the ball is in the g.o.p.'s court. >> you have heard them for the first time i think in two decades they are willing to have revenues go up to make a balanced plan but they have to tell you what they want do on rates and revenues. >> he says there is no plan to an agreement unless they acknowledge tax rates have to go up for the wealthiest americans. >> heather: thank you very much. with less than one month to reach a deal there is new urgency to reach a deal. coming up our political panel will debate the zik go points. >> brand-new reaction today from the potential nominee of u.n. ambassador susan rice to be the next secretary of state. a senator reiterating concerns about statements she made following the benghazi attack that left four americans dead. in the meantime, clare mccaskill came to the ambassador's defense. >> she had reviewed the dpeor foer going. >> on sunday shows and went well beyond the talking points, we have decimated al-qaeda, that was nowhere on the talking points
balanced approach to reducing the deficit. here is a house republican on higher rates. >> republicans are willing to make sure we don't go over this fiscal cliff but at the same time don't harm this economy. what has to happen here if the president shows a little leadership we are willing to stay in the room and stay here and we are willing to get this done. that's why you saw a proposal that is raoeubl reasonable that meets his criteria. >> reporter: steny hoyer said in the next few days we will see substantive movement in private to get this done. jenna: we'll continue to watch the play-by-play, mike, thank you. jon: right now we are continuing to await a speech by former president george w. bush, the speakers are taking to the podium there to get ready to introduce the former president. he is set to address a conference there in dallas, where he will spotlight the positive impact of immigration on u.s. economic growth. this as the g.o.p. looks to attract more hiss to the party. meantime mr. bush's father, former president george h.w. bush is spending another day in the hospital bei
, pay cut contributions will go from 4.% to 6.2%, that's $115 billion a year that will go to deficit reduction instead of being pumped into the economy. heidi cherholts is an economist. >> it's less money for consumers to spend that means the demand for goods and services will drop. who provides goods and services? workers. so employment will fall. >> reporter: those in favor of allowing the tax cut to expire argue money for social security payments has to come from somewhere. with although mejia says that somewhere will mean doing without some of the basics. >> might be a pair of sneakers. might be that jacket that they want to go to school with in the winter. might be those pair of boots that they want to go and keep warm. >> reporter: for john mejia, the debate in washington is not about the federal budget it's about his family's. jim axelrod, cbs news, west new york, new jersey. >> pelley: well, a lot of families with tight budgets will be happy to hear this next story: the housing market is coming back. we got a report today that says home prices in october had their biggest gai
contributions will go from 4.2% to 6.2%. that's $115 billion a year that would go to deficit reduction instead of being pumped into the economy. heidi sherholtz is an economist. >> it's less money for consumers to spend, that means that the demand for business services will drop, who provides goods and services, workers, so employment will fall. >> reporter: those in favor allowing the tax cuts to expire argue money for social security payments has to come from somewhere. although john says that somewhere will mean doing without some of the basics. >> might be a pair of sneakers. >> reporter: might be a jacket. might be those pair of boots that they want to go there and keep warm. >> for john the debate in washington is not about the federal budget it's about his family's. jim axelrod, cbs news, west new york, new jersey. >> early this morning a tentative deal was reached to end the strike that shut down this nation's largest port complex. workers are expected to return to work this morning. clerks at the ports of los angeles and long beach, california had been on strike for eight days. the de
and there should be the maximum spending cuts possible. i think that is not just true for the affect on the deficit, but because the deficit is being monatized at this point in time through quantitative easing it can result in great h greater inflation down the road. he would have thought this is not a time to raise taxes, this is a time to cut government spending. we don't want to have a larger government deficit and this is the course that would lead to the greatest prosperity in the economy. he would not have agreed that if we go over the fiscal cliff that that would have a negative impact on the economy, he would say rather that by bringing the deficit down, by having the prospect of lower inflation in the future, that will be good for interest rates and that would be good for the economy in the coming years. jenna: what would he say to those american citizens, though, that say, listen, over the fiscal cliff, i'm afraid of that, i don't even want to entertain the possibilities of what that would look like. >> i think when it comes to issues such as the extension of unemployment benefits, social
that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington's got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. >> tom: congress and the president have 24 days to reach a deal, before the fiscal cliff's tax hikes and spending cuts take effect. >> susie: mark zandi says "bad things will happen to the economy pretty fast" if lawmakers don't settle the fiscal cliff issue. he's chief economist of moody's analytics. so mark falling off the fiscal cliff means bad things. how bad? >> it could be quite bad, susie. i don't think it's if we get into january and we haven't settled this but if house mars haven't nailed thi down by early february, i think stock investors, bond investors will start to get very very nervous, start selling, risky businesses pull back and by the end of february when we start approaching the ceiling for the debt limit, i think we'll be back in recession. it will be a fairly severe recession. so policy makers have a few weeks but not much more than that. they have to get this together. >> susie: some people are
warned that he won't meet his deficit targets for austerity will have to continue. we expect higher taxes on the rich tomorrow, cuts in public spending, and in this environment the multinationals like google, amazon, starbucks, are very firmly in the firing line. after all what better than to attack big corporate america. and they're being told, smell the coffee. i can play that game, too, michael. >> wake up and smell the coffee. always good to see you, mr. quest. always making it simple for us. richard quest in london. probably didn't pay for that coffee. >>> over the weekend, the palestinians celebrated their new status recognized by the united nations. the joy short-lived. how israel's decision to pursue even more settlements in the west bank and east jerusalem may kill any hopes of peace. we'll dive deep lie into this issue. >>> rp says it's not changing plans for the controversial housing development in east of jerusalem also developments in east jerusalem. this is despite getting a diplomatic mackdown recently from australia, five european countries and the united states bought in
to recession. that will have the worst impact on the deficit that anything will. we got to make sure that the economy continuebes to grow. that is the problem here. i know democrats have this blood lust to raise taxes on supposedly rich people, which are really small business people. but it is not going to do anything to grow the economy. here is what president obama needs. he has to make sure the economy grows. he will be a two-term jimmy carter if the economy goes back in recession and we can't pull ourselves out of this thing. >> eric: i heard you laugh, martin on the "two-term jimmy carter" line. >> he doesn't want to be a two-term george w. bush that took us in a steep recession. >> hey, you are the one with the bush tax cut. >> this can be worked out. everybody knows that. you can raise rates a point or two, that is not going to be end of the world. republicans understand that. let's get through with the fear we have had a couple of weeks of theater and let's get down to serious negotiations. i don't think the republicans want to fight to the death to protect tax breaks for the
not contributed to the deficit. >>neil: show me an entitlement you would top. we are not talking about taking food away from the elderly, is there anything you would touch beyond taxing rich people? >>guest: we have to take a serious look at medicare. >>neil: your organization seems to put out, don't touch that, not now, not part of this deal. >>guest: what we saying, we can generate $950 billion of the $1.2 trillion we need over 10 years without eliminating or reducing benefits with medicare. i am also saying if we are looking for additional cuts and we need to do more everyone must be open. >>neil: but you are not open to the thing you said. you were one of the best speechers at the democratic convention but the speech ain't flying. it is implying it is on the republicans they better cough up more in taxes because we will keep feeding the beast. it is not about taming the beast but feeding the beast. >>guest: i need to say this, most of viewers watch this show now believe that all of us are involved in some kind of negotiation. that is not true. >>neil: there is nothing going on. >>guest: nothin
've been out there on the issue of how we fix our national deficit. as you well know, we face the fiscal cliff, a series of tax hikes and spending cuts that many people think if they go into effect will put the country into recession. yet we heard the treasury secretary tim geithner say the president is willing to see the country go off the fiscal cliff if republicans do not accede to his demands. >> it's probably pretty real. but you can't get to where we need to go by cutting spending, that won't cut it. you're going to destroy a fragile economy. you can't get there by taxing your way into it and you can't grow your way out of this. you have to have a blend. when you have leaders of parties and people from the administration saying i think it will be to the advantage of the democrats to go off the cliff or i think it will be advantage to the republicans to go off the cliff or the president to go off the cliff, that's like betting your country. there's stupidity involved in that. this is big-time stuff. >> let me ask you about a report that some republicans now are perhaps willing to se
had you are plus and the deficit would have been eliminated as we sit here today what changed that was the republican president and congress. what put us on the path we are on now is not democrats. we would have no collective debt at all if we had left in place the clinton budgetary strategy. megyn: what do you make of that quote. >> what i'm responding to is i think what we are dealing with is a tell poar a temporal thing. it would drive the markets down and create say could and uncertainty. the president is saying we can't go through that again. megyn: he's wanting not only to raise it but to have uniform authority to raise. a fewer years ago they were saying that was a failure of leadership. >> he may not get it but he's right to argue that way the republicans have been doing this has been irresponsible. let's get this done in the way our democracy has worked the for hundreds of years. not this new extraordinary thing. i think he's right to put pressure on the republicans. megyn: i thought it was the democrats trying to make this part of the deal to head off -- to stop us f
of protecting lives, but the delicate a structural deficit that the expenditure triggered that without that are basically enough firemen and police. president of on this prompt declaration was much appreciated because it took some of the doubt about whether spending money was going to rebound homering again. if we can look at the per capita threshold that triggers the high reimbursement, the fact is communities deserve that. they've experienced in historic repetition of bad weather that is really now starting to hit home and muscle in terms of the ability to provide basic functions for local government. thank you for holding this hearing and look forward to record the senate and house bipartisan groups to get the right response. >> representative, thank you. as a former member local government, there's so many times you go to the well. as a small tax base coming out of a recession with receipts are down. you make an important point this committee won't be dealing with supplemental directly. indirectly we will because so many of us, not myself on the west coast although born on the east
for $2.2 trillion in deficit reduction, mostly through spending cuts. and while president obama would not answer questions about the counterproposal -- >> no deal better than a bad deal, sir? >> reporter: -- a senior white house official assailed it as a step backward, saying if republicans do not agree to some higher rates for wealthier taxpayer, the nation will go over the cliff, and the american people will hold the republicans responsible. wall street remains optimistic a deal will be struck. so the lack of progress is not yet resulted in a market plunge. but some economists estimate that because of the uncertainty posed by the fiscal cliff, at least 200,000 fewer jobs have been created this year. the official deadline is december 31st at midnight when the ball drops in times square. the deadline is before that, a week from friday when the house of representatives is scheduled to go on vacation. in actuality there are fewer than 11 days before they need to work out a deal. jake tapper, abc new, the white house. >> that's scary, 11 days. fellows you sit up there until it gets wrapp
housing administration. it talks about a government report projecting a $16 billion deficit in the fha mutual mortgage and current fund. from the senate banking committee, this is an hour and half. >> i call this hearing to order. thank you for joining us, mr. secretary. i asked you to testify today because i'm deeply concerned about the recent report that the f.h.a. could potentially need taxpayer support for the first time in its 78-year history. i would like you to help the committee gain insight into the fiscal challenges at the f.h.a. and what h.u.d. has done and can do to mitigate losses and address the shortfall in the capital reserve ratio. f.h.a. has been helping save lives of the mortgage market by ensuring that qualified lower to moderate income and first time home buyers have access to credit since 1934. since the beginning of the financial crisis, the f.h.a. has increased its market share from below 5% in 2006 to about 30% at its peak volume in 2009, in pursuant of that mission. this cyclical expansion was essential to the mortgage market, especially for first time home bu
has been public, what president obama wants, or at least his opening offer for deficit reduction, about $1.6 trillion in new taxes and significantly less in spending cuts. in entitlement reform, and now you have the white house really sensing that they have some leverage here, saying to house republicans, you know what? you go ahead and you put the meat on the bones when it comes to this really politically precarious part of entitlement which is often construed as cutting entitlements like medicare. here's what tim geithner said. >> we laid out a program of how we do it in what stages with $600 million of spending cuts in ten years over entitlement programs. the thing now is for them to come to us and say here's what we think makes sense. we've told them hat we think makes sense. they have to come tell us. >> so he's drawing a line there in the sand. we also heard over the weekend from house speaker john boehner that he found geithner's proposal flabbergasting. he said it wasn't serious. but what you have, zoraida, is the white house and democrats sensing that they do have the le
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)